Bunions, Hammertoes, and Neuromas

Bunions

It is estimated that bunions occur in 33 percent of the population in Western countries. A bunion is a bone deformity caused by an enlargement of the joint at the base and side of the big toe (metatarsophalangeal joint). Bunions form when the toe moves out of place. The enlargement and its protuberance cause friction and pressure as they rub against footwear. Over time, the movement of the big toe angles in toward the other toes, sometimes overlapping a third toe (known as Hallux Valgus). The growing enlargement or protuberance then causes more irritation or inflammation. In some cases, the big toe moves toward the second toe and rotates or twists, which is known as Hallus Abducto Valgus. Bunions can also lead to other toe deformities, such as hammertoe.

Many people with bunions suffer from discomfort and pain from the constant irritation, rubbing, and friction of the enlargement against shoes. The skin over the toe becomes red and tender. Because this joint flexes with every step, the bigger the bunion gets, the more it hurts to walk. Over time without treatment, complications (including bursitis or arthritis) may set in. The skin on the bottom of the foot may become thicker, and everyday walking may become difficult—all contributing to chronic pain.

Wearing shoes that are too tight is the leading cause of bunions. Bunions are not hereditary, but they do tend to run in families, usually because of a faulty foot structure. Foot injuries, neuromuscular problems, flat feet, and pronated feet can contribute to their formation. Family Foot & Ankle Specialists offers both surgical and non-surgical treatments for bunions.

Bunion Symptoms

  • Enlargement of toe joint

  • Enlargement and protuberance of toe

  • Discomfort and pain

  • Constant irritation, rubbing, and friction against shoes

  • Pain when walking

These symptom lists are not meant for self-diagnosis. See Dr. Baird at the first sign of your feet or ankle problems. Most common foot conditions will only worsen without proper care, and may become serious quickly when left untreated.

Hammertoes

Hammertoe is a deformity of the second, third, or fourth toes. In this condition, the toe is bent at the middle joint, causing it to resemble a hammer. Left untreated, hammertoes can become inflexible and require surgery. People with hammertoe may have corns or calluses on the top of the middle joint of the toe or on the tip of the toe. They may also feel pain in their toes or feet and have difficulty finding comfortable shoes.

The primary causes of hammertoe include improperly fitting shoes and muscle imbalance. Treatment for the condition typically involves wearing shoes with soft, roomy toe boxes and toe exercises to stretch and strengthen the muscles. Commercially available straps, cushions, or nonmedicated corn pads may also relieve symptoms. In severe cases, hammertoe surgery may be recommended to correct the deformity.

Hammertoe Symptoms

  • Toe bent at middle joint

  • Inflexible toes

  • Corns or calluses on middle joint or tip of toe

These symptom lists are not meant for self-diagnosis. See Dr. Baird at the first sign of your feet or ankle problems. Most common foot conditions will only worsen without proper care, and may become serious quickly when left untreated.

Neuromas

A neuroma is an enlarged, benign growth of nerves, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas are caused by tissue rubbing against and irritating the nerves. Pressure from poorly fitting shoes or an abnormal bone structure can also lead to this condition. Symptoms may include sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, tingling, or pain in the ball of the foot. Treatments generally include wearing corrective shoes or orthotics and/or cortisone injections. In severe cases, surgical removal of the growth may be necessary.

Morton’s neuroma is a thickening of tissues around the nerve that leads to the toes. Morton’s neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes in response to irritation, such as that caused by wearing high-heeled or narrow shoes, or from trauma. Symptoms may include a burning pain that radiates from the ball of the foot to the toes or numbness in the toes. Conservative treatments usually resolve the pain or progressions of the condition, and range from wearing roomier, lower-heeled footwear or using orthotics to reduce the pressure on the nerve, to injections of cortosteroid medication to reduce swelling and inflammation.

Neuroma Symptoms

  • Sensations of thickness, burning, numbness, or tingling

  • Pain in the ball of the foot

These symptom lists are not meant for self-diagnosis. See Dr. Baird at the first sign of your feet or ankle problems. Most common foot conditions will only worsen without proper care, and may become serious quickly when left untreated.

We are currently accepting new patients, give us a call today at 847.381.5011.

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